Thursday, April 27, 2017

Getting The Big Picture



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.

Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!

    Many Thanks to Phil Monahan, Editor at the Orvis Fly Fishing News page, for carrying my essay this week. Phil manages to post some very good fly fishing news there every day. 


Story: “Getting The Big Picture” on an Alaskan Stream


Written by: Bob Triggs, searuns.com

The author (left) shows off a Lower Talarik Creek, Iliamna rainbow, landed by angler Bob Kuhn.
Photo courtesy: Bob Kuhn 2000
The DeHavilland Beaver lifted off of the quiet lake surface at dawn, leaving a trail of water sluicing off of the trailing edges of the floats. I was being sent out, with the float plane and pilot, and only one fishing guest from the lodge. This was unusual. Ordinarily, we would guide three, four, or more guests in a day, with one or two guides and a pilot–sometimes even two planes. But this guest was traveling solo, and he wanted his whole week-long Alaska visit that way, always fishing alone with one guide.
We flew south across Lake Iliamna, toward Katmai. The sun was just coming up from behind Mount Augustine, the volcano on Cook Inlet. I couldn’t believe my luck. One plane and pilot, and one guest, for an entire week. And we were scheduled to go to a different location every day; flying in, hiking and wading rivers, rowing a raft at times, running a jet boat at other times. My guest was Tom, a middle-aged man, retiring from a successful career in advertising. He could afford it. After an hour, we circled over our landing spot on the shore of a big lake, dipping one wing and scanning the shallows for logs, rocks, debris, bears other planes, and the like. We were clear to land.
Once we got our packs and rods from the plane, we pushed the Beaver off the shore, into deeper water, and the pilot cranked the engine. As we hiked up along the creek-side trail, the Beaver roared overhead, dripping water from the floats down on us. Beaver pilots are like that. Tom smiled at the surprise shower, which I took as a good sign. It was early June, and we were hitting this spot for the first time that season. It was dry-fly fishing time, and after their spring spawning period, the fish would likely be hungry and quick to take flies. It is a mile hike to the beginning of the better fishing, and Tom remarked how nice and wide and smooth the trail was. I told him that the bears have been using this trail for thousands of years, so it’s pretty well established. He smiled again. Good attitude.
We got to the upper run, took a break for coffee and cookies, and rigged up the rods. I tied a size 10 Hornberg on Tom’s tippet: “This is a good searching pattern.” Tom shrugged, and he began to step down off the high, grassy riverbank and into the water.
Whoa!, I said. “Let’s not disturb this little stream right away. We can fish it from the banks for starters–crouching, kneeling, even lying down if we have to. It’s only a few feet deep, and twenty feet wide here.”
Tom seemed surprised and confused. He was wearing $400 waders, and I wouldn’t let him get into the water. So he just made some easy casts to the head of the run, got a few short clean drifts, and was into a nice rainbow right away. The trout was in good shape: not as fat as it would be in August, but big enough to work Tom’s rod and wrist. We gradually worked our way down the stream, catching a fish here and there, still without wading at all.
“I have never fished with such a short line before,” Tom said.

Sometimes it pays to stay out of the water and make casts from your knees.
Photo by Sandy Hays
Then we saw a nice trout, over 20 inches, rising repeatedly to sip something small from the surface. Tom dropped the fly right on top the rise, and the trout stopped feeding. After a minute, it would resume rising, Tom would try the drift again, and the fish would shut off. This went on for a few minutes. We changed flies to a smaller Blue-Winged Olive and added a longer, lighter tippet. Eventually, Tom crept into the water, wading toward the rising trout, and he started pretty much slapping the trout on the head with the fly and leader. No dice. The trout was done. Tom was frustrated, and he wasn’t smiling anymore. That trout was right in front of him, and it wouldn’t take the fly.
I invited Tom to come out of the water and take a break, back from the edge of the stream about twenty feet, where we could sit in the shade in the deep grass. We lit up cigars and just watched and waited. I told him to try to scan the entire stream in front of him, not just studying that one trout, but taking in the whole scene in front of him. “Give them a few minutes to forget us.” He still wasn’t smiling. His face seemed tight. He wasn’t happy. He wanted results. Eventually, he began to notice that there were other trout in the run, and some of them were rising, feeding in a regular pattern. And the one big trout he liked so much was back on the feed too, but now it was a few yards farther up in the run.
Gradually, a look of wonder spread across Tom’s face. He was enthralled by all the life he was now seeing. It had been there the whole morning, but he had missed it all when he got so focused on that one fish. I set Tom up for a reach cast, still from twenty feet back from the edge of the water, and another ten feet to the fish. Luckily we had backcast room. Tom made this cast, lying on his left side in the grass, with a cigar in his teeth; one false cast, and he dropped the fly a few feet upstream of the trout. The pattern drifted just a few inches before the trout shot up to the surface and snatched the fly. I know I was smiling. Tom was astonished, and he was smiling too.
We fished the rest of that morning by crawling, kneeling, lying and sitting in the deep grass in the shade, and picking off one hungry trout after another with only a few different flies. At lunch, Tom marveled at the shift in his state of mind, once he had stepped back from his tunnel-vision perspective and taken in a broader, wider view of the stream, the trout, and their behavior. All he had to do was step back and quietly observe the bigger picture. And then go back with a lighter presentation and catch the one that was driving him crazy–and then catch a lot more.
This approach will work with just about any feeding fish, if you don’t screw it up too badly to begin with. And wild fish that have never been caught before, or haven’t been caught in a long while, will have forgotten how to avoid your dragging fly and sloppy presentations. But it won’t take them long to lose interest if you insist on bashing away at them. This is equally true of the sea-run coastal cutthroat trout that we fish for in the Puget Sound saltchuck.
If you are trying too hard, and the fish are right in front of you, actively feeding and avoiding your fly, just quietly slip away, even if only for a few yards. Give them a break. Lighten up. Give them a chance to resume their feeding patterns, without you interrupting that. Once they are back in a rhythm of their own, you can try a smaller fly, a dead drift, and shorter presentation. ( Meaning: don’t whack them on the head with the damned thing! ) It’s a good idea to take the time to just watch, frequently, during your fishing day. If all you are doing is staring at the fly and casting, casting, casting, you’ll miss a lot. You just might find that there’s more going on, right in front of you, than you realized.
Bob Triggs guides fly fishers on the beaches, rivers, and streams of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. He fishes for sea-run coastal cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. Check out his blog.

     And now, a few words on the local fly fishing conditions:

     As most of you know, it's been a blustery, cool and wet spring here in Puget Sound country so far. And we have been dodging rain, wind and waves on most of the last month's sea-run cutthroat trips on the beaches. The rivers have been jumping up and down like a Yo-Yo for months too. April has been full of surprises this year. Here's a humorous look at the regional observations for this week ahead, from Dr Cliff Mass:


    Here on the eastern Olympic Peninsula beaches, we are not getting the kind of darkness and rain that they are seeing down in Olympia, Tacoma, or from Seattle to Everett, (in the Puget Sound Convergence Zone. We are enjoying drier, fairer weather here, and more sunshine. That's just the way the Olympic Mountains Rainshadow works. And it has been getting a little better each week. 


That's what I'm talking about!

    Once the planet starts tilting toward the sun again, and the northern hemisphere waters begin to warm up, life blossoms here on every level. And we are seeing those signs of life returning to our waters every few days. The sea-run Cutthroat are on the feed in the saltchuck. Numerous forage species are spreading into the shallows along the edges of the beaches, in the tide pools, etc. These cool, bright, salty days of fly fishing are invigorating. My fisheries restoration and research friends tell me that they are observing a "delay," of from one week to several weeks, in the appearance of the salmon fry and smolt that they trap and count in the lower reaches of the smaller restoration streams every spring. So here we are, at the end of April, and things are just beginning to get really good. And all of this extended wet weather bodes well for the salmon, steelhead and trout that are spawning in the rivers. Lets go fishing!


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized, private and group fly fishing and fly casting instruction, for beginners through expert casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure. I also do public presentations for civic groups, private gatherings, and fly fishing clubs, Naturalist guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for spring through fall 2017! 


And sometimes we row . . .
This is the way to go fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat!

SSShhh!!! Listen to the quiet . . . 

                                    
Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618





Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Between The Squalls



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & release, Fly Fishing Only!


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Between the squalls.

Related image
Small Craft Advisory


Image result for Small Craft Gale Warning
Gale Warning


    Getting out on the water this spring has been a real cat and mouse game of  dodging the winds, waves and rain. Otherwise, it's been pretty cool. I don't mind a little wind and rain, and there's been plenty of days when the fishing was great, even when conditions were sloppy. But once the waves build, and begin to churn against the beaches, and the water is changing to that marl color, it's over. This will usually depend upon your location. Sometimes You can just go to another beach, and find better conditions there, even in the same wind etc. Paying attention to your N.O.A.A. Marine Weather forecasts and reports can be very helpful in trip planning, especially in the days and hours before you head out. Generally a Small Craft Advisory is letting you know that at the least, it is going to get windy, maybe too windy, and wave conditions may become unfavorable for fishing in many locations, much less running a small boat.  A Gale Warning is letting you know that you won't be fishing that day, at least not from a boat. (But this also sometimes depends upon your specific location.)

Taken from a NOAA Marine Weather Warning:



PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A GALE WARNING MEANS WINDS OF 34 TO 47 KNOTS ARE IMMINENT OR
OCCURRING. OPERATING A VESSEL IN GALE CONDITIONS REQUIRES
EXPERIENCE AND PROPERLY EQUIPPED VESSELS. IT IS HIGHLY
RECOMMENDED THAT MARINERS WITHOUT THE PROPER EXPERIENCE SEEK SAFE
HARBOR PRIOR TO THE ONSET OF GALE CONDITIONS.

A SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY MEANS THAT WIND SPEEDS OF 21 TO 33 KNOTS
ARE EXPECTED TO PRODUCE HAZARDOUS WAVE CONDITIONS TO SMALL CRAFT.
INEXPERIENCED MARINERS...ESPECIALLY THOSE OPERATING SMALLER
VESSELS SHOULD AVOID NAVIGATING IN THESE CONDITIONS.

   It's amazing how often I have seen local conditions improve, even with serious regional warnings in place. Some of this is because the NOAA forecasters are concerned with life and property, and they are telling you to keep your boat at the dock. Because so many mariners depend upon the forecast models, NOAA has a tendency to warn us on the cautionary side of things. Many mariners have gotten themselves into dire circumstances by ignoring these warnings. And locally, here on the Olympic Peninsula, it has a lot to do with the wind direction to begin with, and how this interacts with the Olympic Mountains, and the Olympic Rainshadow. So sometimes you just need to do a little driving and hoofing, and you just might find some sweet little pockets of quieter air and water. And when you do, don't be surprised if you don't run into some bait, and the sea-run cutthroat trout feeding on them. If you do see these warning flags, or hear these warnings on your marine weather radio, don't launch your boat!  


    Here's some good news!

   Fisheries biologist and master fly angler, Richard Stoll, has finally published his long awaited book on the sea-run coastal cutthroat trout. This is a very deep look into the life history and range of the wild sea-run cutthroat, from California to Alaska. And with special emphasis on modern conservation concerns, and heavy coverage of fishing, flies, presentations, reading saltwater currents, structures, etc. This book covers material never before published, including responsible catch and release strategies and impacts, and cutthroat fly angler ethics. You can get it at:

                          www.westsoundangler.com 


Image may contain: sky, text, outdoor, water and nature







Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction for beginners through expert casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure. Public presentations, Naturalist guide, Rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and River trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April, May, and more! 



And sometimes we row . . .
This is the way to go fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat!
SSShhh!!! Listen to the quiet . . . 

                                    

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618









Sunday, March 19, 2017

Spring Fever


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide. 
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


"One last look"
Cutthroat Trout
More fine sporting art by Bob White available here:
www.bobwhitestudio.com



Spring fe·ver

spriNG ˈfēvər/
noun
  1. a feeling of restlessness and excitement felt at the beginning of spring sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fly fishing season.

    
      By all accounts we have had one of the wettest winters on record here in the Pacific Northwest. And with this spring solstice I am really appreciating the few sunny dry days we have had. Once Daylight Savings time comes around, I begin to get that itch about spring cutthroat fishing on the saltchuck again.  And there's been all of the good little things going on here outside my cabin window too; the eagles are pairing up in their new nest, just yards from the porch. The nights are getting milder, the days sunnier, the clover is blooming, buds are opening up everywhere, everything green is so much greener, the frogs are peeping, and I can smell the exposed tide flats again. I would mow the lawn, but the yard is a swamp right now. I even saw a mosquito. I have been tying cutthroat trout flies, especially the spring patterns. We don't really have an opening day here. We can fish year-round for the sea-run cutthroat, but I like to lay off of them for most of the winter. I know they  are getting that much fatter and stronger. Wild fish need that. I think that good cutthroat fly fishermen need that too.





"6 X 6 Cutthroat"
By Bob White

  
   The Chum Salmon fry are pouring out of the rivers and into the estuaries now, and will be for weeks to come. The recent warm spring rains and mountain snowpack melt water will push them along too. The sea-run cutthroat trout will be feeding heavily after their spawning, usually by mid April here. 

    And the chum fry are one of their most available prey species now. You'll do well to fly fish for sea-run cutthroat with smaller flies now, like salmon fry imitations, sizes #8 and #10. I usually tie my Chum Baby fly with a 1/8" to 5/32" gold bead. But in the early weeks of spring I will tie some without the bead, and on smaller hooks- size #8 and #10-, with the fly being not longer than one inch. It pays to have some very small flies in the spring. Rolled Muddlers too are a very good pattern for this fishing. As the weeks go by, and the salmon fry are growing every day, you can begin to use larger flies, up to size #6, with longer wings, and with toppings up to 3 inches. Flatwing sandlance flies can be longer still, though you'll still use a shorter shank hook, like the Gamakatsu SC-15. Don't hesitate to use your classic trout streamer flies; the Mickey Finn, Muddler, Hornberg, Adams, Humpy, Stimulator, etc. Just about any trout fly pattern will work on sea-run coastal cutthroat trout on Puget Sound waters at one time or another. Be creative. 



Squeezing the sunlight

from each ripening spring day

Vernal Equinox 

          No doubt we will still be getting some wind, cold and rain, and maybe even a little snow. But the worst of this winter is over now. And we've got an entire fishing season ahead of us. And now it is spring.  




"First Fish"



     We will be back on the water this spring! Just in time for the beginning of another beautiful season of wild sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout fly fishing on the saltwaters and rivers of the Olympic Peninsula, Hood Canal and Puget Sound. Drop me a note or give me a call for details. All trips, casting instruction sessions, presentations, and rowboat picnics must be booked in advance.

Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction for beginners.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide, Rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and  River trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April, May, and more! 


This is the way to go fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat!
SSShhh!!!
Listen to the quiet . . .

                                    

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618



Monday, February 27, 2017

A False Spring



 Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide. 
Catch & Release, Fly fishing only! 



Image may contain: sky, road, outdoor and nature
Late February can break your heart.
Photo by Brian Lencho
I-90 somewhere west of Seattle.


It's almost Chum Baby Time!
You can find them at the Orvis Bellevue fly shop!

      

Chum Baby Note:   The Chum Salmon fry, a key springtime sea-run coastal cutthroat trout prey species in our region, will usually be getting down into the estuaries of their natal streams and rivers beginning by around mid-February in the south Puget Sound region, and a little later by mid-March up north. Weather, river flows and temperatures can impact the timing of their emergence from the gravel redds, so a week's timing either way is not unusual. In the later summer and fall, the Chum Salmon arrive as adults across several months of time. And they don't all spawn at the same time. It takes a few months. So, you'll often see juvenile Chum Salmon of varying sizes through the first few months of spring season. Coming into saltwaters the fry will be about 3/4" to 1-1/4", and growing rapidly. So your early flies can be small and sparse, but always have a few fuller, bigger ones too. Size #8 and #6 cover most of it. South Puget Sound cutthroat anglers usually see the action a few weeks ahead of us up north. 

Here's a link to my March 2013 entry on this fly: 
It's Chum Baby Time!



Juvenile Chum Salmon. 
Photo: U.S.G.S.
            It's not unusual for February to fool you sometimes. You get through the long slog of early winter; darkness, interminable rain, howling Pacific storms, black ice on the roads, and weeks of deep freezing cold, any way you can. And one trick of the mind is to hold out for February, and the return of slightly longer days, more sunshine, moderating temperatures, milder storms. And we can get some pretty nice beach fly fishing days by then too. And sometimes in February we can get a very mild spell of balmy, dry weather. Bring on the blue sky days, the sunny warm glow, the smells of the gardens and beaches, birds feeding, plants and trees budding, frogs trilling, and the cutthroat are out on the beaches, in the shallows, feeding and taking your fly. You might even get some rosy pink color to your face after a day of this fishing. No wonder that it is all to easy to assume that we're having an early spring.

Image result for False spring buds
Early Crocus in a False Spring

     This February did not disappoint, as we shifted from bitter cold winter conditions, to that warming trend of tropical air and balmy weather. And suddenly we were walking around in shirtsleeves, leaving the rain gear home, and the sea-run coastal cutthroat trout were out, with some of the best fishing reports coming in from almost everywhere around Puget Sound country. It's so seductive. Then by the end of February, the colder lightly freezing nights have returned, daytime temperatures are wintry again, along with the frequent chances of snow, rain, and grey skies. And in many areas the trout will be absent. They're up in the creeks and smaller waters, way up in the big rivers, spawning. Cutthroat fishing on the north Puget Sound saltchuck can be kind of quiet through later February and early March. But by April it will be another story entirely here, as millions of juvenile salmon become forage for the hungry, lean, post-spawn Cutthroat trout. And then it really will be spring!


      We will be back on the water this spring! Just in time for the beginning of another beautiful season of wild sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout fly fishing on the saltwaters and rivers of the Olympic Peninsula, Hood Canal and Puget Sound. Drop me a note or give me a call for details. All trips, casting instruction sessions, presentations, and rowboat picnics must be booked in advance.

Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction for beginners.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide, Rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and  River trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April and May! 

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Here comes the sun.




 
Sunrise over the Cascade range.

   February is over a month after the winter solstice. Up until now I have been taking it on faith that the days were getting longer. But by now it is undeniable. And I am feeling optimistic for the progressive return of those long sunny days on the water. Even if it's only adding a few seconds of daylight to each day. I have fished on the beaches a little bit this winter, and we've had some great days. But the weather has been rough too, so timing is everything. The last week of January was superb, with mild days, lots of sun, almost 50 degrees. And some big fat trout around too. This is enough new energy to stimulate me into fixing my leaky waders, checking all of my tackle, and sorting through my fly boxes. And it's time to tie those spring sea run cutthroat trout flies. There's plenty of time. I'm even going to paint the dory again. The cutthroat will be heading into their spawning period shortly, and the fishing on the saltchuck will be slow for a while. It won't hurt to give the fish a break for a time, to allow them to recover. It's amazing what a difference a few weeks can make in the condition and fight of these wild trout. I like to get back to fishing for the sea-run cutthroat trout in mid to late April up here in the northern reaches of Puget Sound country. South Sound anglers enjoy an earlier return of the cutthroat, and the chum fry. We're a few weeks behind them. 

  This will be my 37th season as a fly fisherman. So you would think that I am kind of over the excitement and anticipation of the coming spring. But I'm not. I spend the early winter months thinking about the fishing we did earlier in the year, remembering things about the way the water was, how the tides and winds were on some days, and remembering the fish that we caught. There's always a few days that I will never forget.   And I spend some time each winter, scouting new water too; looking over marine charts, tide and current tables, and road maps. Every year I like to try some new water. I have been fishing here on the Olympic Peninsula for the last 16 years, and there's still so much to see and do here. It's a lifes work.

   I try to add some new flies to my fishing too. This is something that we can do throughout our fly fishing lives. It's amazing to contemplate the variety of trout flies that can be used for sea-run cutthroat fly fishing. Just about any trout fly will work at one time or another, not just saltwater flies. Dry fly fishing on the saltchuck is a hoot. And even though we may have our favorites, we should always be trying some new things. If you are tying your own flies, then you know how rewarding this can be. If you aren't already tying, I encourage you to get into it soon. This really rounds out your fly fishing adventure. Catching fish on your own hand tied flies is very satisfying. I just got this message from fly tying dynamo and sea-run cutthroat guru Jeffrey Delia today. This looks like a good opportunity to learn some new fly tying ideas:
Howdy Folks,
Just thought I would let you all know there are still a couple of seats left for my Steelhead/Salmon Fly Tying Class this Saturday Jan. 28
 at Peninsula Outfitters in Poulsbo. If you’re interested please call the shop at 360-394-1599.
I hope you have all been doing some Winter Cutthroat fishing, we have had some great fishing recently and you can read about it and see some of the fish pics on my Facebook page. If we are not friends on Facebook and you would like to be just type in Jeffrey Delia Facebook page and send me a friend request.
Thanks,
Jeffrey 
Jeffrey Delia http://www.oysterchannel.com Food, Fish, Fun and Fideos from the Pacific Northwest

       Spring sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fishing season is just a few months away!

       Bob Triggs  
       littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com
       www.searuns.com