Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Summer Sublime


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!
Fly fishing for Coho salmon. 

      I am loving this superb, sunny summer weather! Even though I did get roasted a few weeks ago. But now that the second degree burns have healed, and the last layers of  skin have fallen from my ears and lips, I am back in action. Broad brimmed hat, sunglasses, long sleeve sun shirt, sun gloves, gobs of SPF 40 sunscreen . . . Check! I want to be able to remember how sweet this sunny warmth is four months from now, when it's cold and grey and raining.

   Salmon season opened on July 16th here this year.
Looking out on the Admiralty Inlet waters that morning at dawn, it looked like a naval invasion- Hundreds of fishing boats were working from point Wilson to the southern end of Marrowstone Island alone. And this went on for the entire first week. Last year the state closed the Chinook salmon season within a few weeks of the opener, because they had already nearly met the entire summer harvest quota. This year they closed it in one week flat. But this time they are evaluating the run size to see if it can be reopened later. We are still able to fish for coho though. Swinging flies in a tide current, wading in knee-deep water. That's the way I like to fish. We'll just have to wait and see how it goes.

UPDATED! Link here: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=2175



Image may contain: one or more people
I'm breaking out these Bad Boys!

   Sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fishing has been up and down here so far, with our good days and slow days. I am certain that the brief extremes of heat had something to do with this. One thing that I have noticed is that we have more two-year-old and three-year-old cutthroat out in the saltchuck around here this year. And they are growing fast. Not surprising since the schools of juvenile herring here have really exploded this season.  So this fall the fishing might be really good again. The more the merrier. One of the more interesting reports came from a friend who saw a Minke whale, cruising along the edge of the beach, where he was wading and casting flies for cutthroat. I guess he got out of the water for a few minutes!  This is one of the great things about beach fishing here, we see a lot of cool stuff.

   We have had several very hot periods here so far, and we're well into the summer drought and fire season now. There are a record number of wildfires around the state right now. See: "Morning Briefing" here.  So if you are coming to the Olympic Peninsula waters to hike, camp or fish this summer, especially up in the mountains, you need to be careful about fires. Statewide Fire ban information here.   Olympic National Park will have it's own rules.


You can't have enough Clouser flies this time of year!

    When it gets this hot in the summer, mid to high 80's or higher, we can expect that some waters will warm up quickly. Dawn will be your best opportunity for trout fishing anywhere. Deeper lakes and some saltwater situations, will often have cooler water, and better fishing conditions during the day. The key is finding water at 60 degrees or cooler. Warmer water will stress the fish too much. On a bright summer day the saltwater shallows will be very warm. Find the cooler, deeper water on an incoming tide.  I have never really been a fan of heavy, deep sinking lines and weighted flies. But now is the time to be fishing deeper and slower, any way that you can do it. I will often rig two rods for a day, one with an intermediate sinking line, or sinking leader, and one with a floating line. That increases my options. It's amazing though, how deep you can drift a fly on a long leader, with a floating line. Clouser flies, bead head soft hackles, cone heads, etc., will sink like a stone with a slow enough drift, even in a current. I still much prefer surface fishing in the saltchuck, with Poppers, Sliders, Gurglers, Muddlers, etc. Many baitfish fly patterns can be tied sparsely, with no added weight, and will swim just beneath the surface with only moderate stripping action. Adding  a bit of fly floatant to a light streamer fly can really get it on top. This will work just as well in some lake fishing situations, before the bright sun gets out on the water and sends the fish down deep again.
Fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat from a classic Swampscott Dory.
For one angler. By appointment only.


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

     I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking through October and beyond. Please call or write for details.

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U.Beach Watcher
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618


   

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Mad Dogs and Fishing Guides



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


  Summer is right on time this year. I know because, after 9 hours of rowing around the bay under the hot sun yesterday, today I look like a boiled beet. There's always that one day, usually earlier in the season,when I forego the sunscreen, and I pay the price. Hopefully, I have gotten this stupidity out of the way for the rest of the year. Please remember to cover up, wear a long sleeved sun shirt, shading hat, sun gloves, and use a strong, zinc based, sunscreen, and drink plenty of water through the day. Sunglasses are mandatory.

  The summer sun has been heating up the beaches here. And the softer, shallower waters, back eddies and tide pools, lagoons etc., are warming up too. Look for the cooler water, and currents, on the incoming tides, to  provide the better opportunities to meet up with trout and salmon now. It doesn't always have to be deeper water, but often that is the case as well. Now is the time of year that I will fish sink tips, and sinking leaders. A favorite is the "Clear Poly" type leaders, and Airflow has some of the best options, 7 of them, from floating to deep sinking. Personally, I like the longer ones.

  I am hearing good things from the salty west end of the Olympic Peninsula, as salmon season is in full-swing there. They're seeing good numbers of coho, and they are bigger than they have been in the last few years. Puget Sound salmon fishing has been turning out some really good news lately too. Ocean (feeding) conditions are improving for the migrating salmon and steelhead. This year there were markedly higher than usual numbers of coho smolt counted as they moved out of their streams and into the saltwaters. So maybe now we can appreciate the utility of the closures put in place a few years ago. I am really looking forward to fishing the tides this year. Salmon season opens here in Washington Marine Are #9 on July 16th this year. It will be interesting to see how it goes. The new moon is upon us, with some serious tidal exchanges, and the tides are going to be great for the next few weeks leading up to the full moon. I like this for salmon fishing, and hot weather sea-run cutthroat trout fishing too. Bring on the cold water!

 
Were seeing some nice sea-run coastal cutthroat trout lately.

     June brought plenty of rain to make up for the dry May we had out here. The rivers got a few nice shots of fresh flows, the mountains got some snow. It's melting fast now. And the Olympic Peninsula rivers are now running low and clear. If you are into hunting for trout now, in these rivers, you will need to bring a headlamp for dawn patrol. Dawn and dusk will the best times. Smaller dry flies, ants, beetles, etc., can be very good. Patience and lots of hiking just might pay off. Whatever you do, wherever you go, savor every moment of this beautiful summer!

Fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat from a classic Swampscott Dory.
By appointment only.


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

     I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking through October and beyond. Please call or write for details.

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U.Beach Watcher
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618






Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Post-Solstice Interim "Sprummer"

The Post-Solstice Interim "Sprummer"

Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & release, fly fishing only.


The Post Solstice Interim "Sprummer"

Pacific Northwest Facts of Life

 You can almost set your watch by the near-perfect timing of our annual segway from spring into summer, as these last weeks of June-u-ary so reliably remind us, that for some of the year anyway, we are in the wettest part of the region. Cool cloudy days and colder nights, winds from the southern quarters, and occasional thundershowers, high water and messy beaches, small craft warnings and gales . . . you would think we were going back into winter. But with each passing day these events become less intense, more beneficial than difficult, and  before you know it you are out there on the water, enjoying some of the most refreshing weather we get all year. Between the raindrops we do pretty well here sometimes. By the 1st of July we will have a seasonal outdoors burning ban, and we will be the driest region of the entire country for two to three months. And it will be full-on summer here again. Mostly. Hopefully. 

On the saltchuck, were seeing tons of juvenile herring this year around the Olympic Peninsula beaches and nearshore areas. They have metamorphosed by now, and they are running around 2 inches long, and growing quickly. I tie my herring flies from around 1-1/2 to 3 inches long now. And very sparse. If there's a key thing in herring flies in particular, it is to feature some amount of deep, rich blue color in the topping. It doesn't have to be a lot. But it does work well. Tie them sparsely, so you can see plenty of light shining through them in the water. I don't ordinarily use much tinsel or flash on my baitfish flies. But sandlance do have a unique, colorful sparkle to them. They are brightly multicolored at times.

Some other very commonplace forage species for sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fly fishing are sculpin and stickleback. There's countless sculpin fly patterns to work with. There's dozens of distinct species in the Puget Sound region waters alone. But I have found that drably colored flies, mottled in appearance, in grays and greens and browns, sometimes in a mix of those colors, works very well. Always have a few black ones handy too. They hold near the bottom mostly, so of course you can tie them with weight;  coneheads, beads, lead wraps, pre-cast sculpin heads, etc. And you can tie them with no weight at all. I like the Muddler fly, and the cutthroat do too. Perhaps because of it's sculpin-like or "bullhead" profile. I fish deer hair sculpin on the surface, greased with floatant, with lots of action. The Matuka fly is a perfect sticklebak fly pattern, weighted and unweighted. Most of the time I am fishing with a floating line, and I use longer leaders and slower, deeper presentations, to get the weighted flies down when the fish might be deeper. This works great with bead head soft hackle flies too. And it is an easier technique in faster flowing water. Fast water has a way of ripping heavier sink tips and sinking lines around too quickly. It's a trick to get a fly to work deeply, slowly, in fast water. Employing a Poly leader can do this at times.
A mix of Baitfish Clousers.
The blue back flies emulate herring.

With July comes more consistent heat, fewer clouds, and some of the hottest days of the year will run through July and August. So you have to keep water temperatures in mind when you are trout fishing anywhere, in the saltchuck, or the fresh waters. I think that very early morning fishing in many paces will the best stewardship option. A stream thermometer is a good thing to have handy, even in the saltwaters. In the heat of the summer, the saltchuck in some locations, especially the broad, shallow flats and bays, can get too warm to hook and play and land trout. Look for the deeper, cooler water. Often that will be during an incoming tide.  Lake fishing is almost always a good summer fishing option, depending upon the lakes. The deeper lakes will often fish more consistently through the summer heat. The deeper regions of these lakes won't have much of a temperature change year-round.

You have so many fisheries open around the region now, that it will be hard to make up your mind where to go fishing. Lakes, streams, rivers, bays . . .  One thing that I try to do every summer is to find some new place to fish, somewhere on the Olympic Peninsula that I have never fished before. I have been out here for almost 20 years now, and there's still plenty of water for me to explore. I like the way Doug Rose wrote about this place, and the fishing. He had his heart in it. Seek out his words. Once it gets too hot to go fishing, you can sit in the shade and read Doug's books instead.  

My favorite Doug Rose fly fishing book.



Fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat from a classic Swampscott Dory.
By appointment only.


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

     I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking through October and beyond. Please call or write for details.

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U.Beach Watcher
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Summer Solstice


Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide.
Catch & release, fly fishing only!

Summer Solstice 

Walking the Island beach trail.

   When I talk about beach fishing with people who are unfamiliar with the Olympic Peninsula and our saltwater fishing, they always think only of summer. It is hard to convince people that we have year-round fly fishing on these beaches, even in the winter. People have a picture in their minds of sun washed sandy beaches, blue skies, and bluebird weather. And of course we all enjoy the fishing during these typically fair and sunny summer days. Especially with a light onshore breeze coming down from the northwest most of the time. Our air conditioning provided by the cooling influence of the Pacific Ocean waters. The weather gets calmer now, and we rarely see any significant winds or stormy waves. Brisk mornings, Warm, dry sunny days, cooling evenings. It will usually be like this right through September. 


Releasing a wild sea-run Cutthroat trout.

   We have had an unexpectedly mild June here this year. With only a few blasts of wind, and very little rain. This is hardly the "June-U-Ary" weather that we have grown to expect and to endure annually here. No one is complaining. With the solstice here today, and the summer conditions we are already enjoying, it's been just about full-on summer here now. The beaches are in beautiful shape. And so are our rivers. And with the first quarter waxing moon upon us, the tides are running good and cold here this coming week, and right through the end of June. And it looks like the afternoons and evenings will be really nice for flooding tides. By the end of the month the tide ranges will be deeper and stronger with the full  moon approaching. You can't beat fishing into twilight this time of year, on a rising tide, and a full moon.

Check out the 10 day forecast: 
https://www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/weather/10_day.cgi

The next week or two looks perfect for trout and summer steelhead fishing on the Olympic Peninsula rivers. I like using dry flies, but you can't beat a good soft hackle fly at a time like this. Early morning and later afternoon into evening fishing will be the best times. But I have to tell you, I would rather be fishing the saltchuck anytime.
  

Juvenile Herring, Photo Jack Devlin

   
   I was talking with my fishing friend, after a local sea-run cutthroat fishing day here, a few years ago. At one point on the outgoing tide we saw a large, dark mass of small fish, moving along slowly in the ebb. It took us a moment to focus on what we were seeing- many thousands of juvenile herring, from 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 inches long, all bunched up together in a "ball", right at the edges of the beach. Just down-current of the herring were some resident coho salmon, and, surprised, we caught and released a few of them right then and there. And we have been seeing plenty of "bait ball" activity, with all of the the attendant wheeling and diving birds etc., along our beaches, and well out into the open waters of north Puget Sound and Admiralty Inlet now. The marine biologists who work here locally are telling me that many of these bait balls are actually large schools of sandlance. So there's two important fly patterns for you to be using this time of year- herring and sandlance, from to 2 to 4 inches in length. Everything, including the sea-run Cutthroat, feeds on these important forage species all year. Flatwing flies will do nicely for this. Count on these forage fish to be in abundance for the next few months, many of them close to shore. 


I tie these Flatwing style herring / sandlance flies for sea-run coastal cutthroat trout.


Fly fishing for sea-run Cutthroat from a classic Swampscott Dory.
By appointment only.


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

     I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking through October and beyond. Please call or write for details.

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U.Beach Watcher
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618


Friday, June 1, 2018

Rowing For Cutthroat


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide. 
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!



Fly fishing for sea-run coastal cutthroat trout with a vintage design, 

fully restored, Swampscott Dory

    I have been out in the dory all spring, rowing on the bay, scouting the local estuaries, beaches and shorelines, for sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fly fishing opportunities. There's a lot of good water and cutthroat trout habitat here, miles of it. Every month I go looking for new water, mostly on the east end of the Olympic Peninsula and Hood Canal. It seems like there's no end to it. Puget Sound alone has over 1300 miles of shoreline. This is a great way to spend the day. When I am guiding with the dory I only take one angler. That's the best opportunity. It's quiet, stealthy, no motor, no fumes. Sometimes we catch trout directly behind the dory, or within a few easy to cast yards off the sides. I can row you into shallow water, just inches of depth, and we can handle the wind and waves when we need to as well. This is the most traditional way of sea-run cutthroat trout fishing in Puget Sound.

    It's been more like summer than spring here most days lately. This turned out to be the warmest and driest may on record here. And the next 10 day regional forecast is looking very good here too. Our Olympic Peninsula rivers are running below normal in flows right now. this is not unexpected with such a long protracted dry spell. But our annual drought season usually begins in July. So maybe it's early. And maybe June will bring us some more rain to perk things up on the rivers.

    Sea-Run Cutthroat fishing has been picking up here through the month of May. There's lots of first season in the saltchuck fish showing up, at 2 to 3 years old and 8 to 10 inches. And we've seen plenty of bigger trout this spring here too. They've been taking our Chum Baby fly, Muddlers, Gurglers, Miyawaki Beach Poppers, and various baitfish flies, especially the Clouser Minnow.

    
Sea-run cutthroat flies
    "Clouser Minnow" 
  
 

    The bright sunny days we have had actually warmed up the water in our shallower bays. We found the best fishing on the colder water incoming tides, and at depths of 8 to 12 feet at times. Some people will use a sink tip line or full sinking line, to get deep. But I use  a longer leader and a floating line, and sometimes a fluorocarbon tippet, with a weighted fly like the Clousers, and I can get the fly very deep. You've got to let it sink! But this is something we ordinarily see happening in later June and into July and August. Don't  worry too much about this, because the best sea-runs we have caught were all caught in shallow water under bright sunny skies and hot days. Go figure. It does matter where you fish, and when. Our tidal flows here are coming out of the deeper areas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Admiralty Inlet, so we get a lot of cold water coming in on the floods. The farther south you go into Puget Sound and Hood Canal this time of year, the warmer the water and the tougher the fishing can be. As is true of trout fishing anywhere, once the water gets above 60 degrees, it's getting too warm to fish without damaging the trout. That might happen earlier than expected this season. Look for the colder water! Trout season is going to be opening up just about everywhere later this month! 

 I  guide fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers, lakes and streams. We walk and wade, or row the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and we fish in the rivers for trout and summer  run steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventures, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide, Rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and  River trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October. Please plan ahead! 
                                 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

"Ask your doctor if being this happy is right for you!"


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!

Greg fishing the skinny water on a small coastal stream.

     The first year that Greg came out to fish with me he wanted to fly fish the Olympic Peninsula for most of the Fourth of July week. And he wanted to do something different almost every day. I was keen on sharing the sea-run cutthroat fishing in Puget Sound with him, but I knew he would enjoy all of the other fishing options I could offer him too. So I planned each of our fishing days separately- around saltwater beach fishing, small stream fishing, lake fishing and big river fishing. We have sea-run cutthroat, river-run cutthroat, summer steelhead, a few rare resident rainbow, (Called residualized steelhead by the biologists around here.), and a mix of stocked lake fishing opportunities, with cutthroat and rainbows to choose from.

    In the beginning, and for the first few years that he came out here, we focused on one kind of fishing, in one area, saltwater beaches rivers or lakes, for each outing. But after a few years running of his annual visits here, we began to mix things up on each trip. And eventually we had worked out a repertoire of dry fly fishing on some of the streams lower reaches, for cutthroat, not far from tidewater, usually in the morning and through early afternoons. It can be hot here in mid July, so being in the fresh cool stream flows is refreshing, especially with good shade from the trees overhead, dense along the riverbanks. By early afternoon we would take a rest in the shade, often just sitting on the riverbanks, and have a nice cool shady lunch. We would watch the Flycatchers and Cedar Waxwings and Red Winged Blackbirds, as they chased and fed on countless flies that were swarming over the waters. Then after lunch we might wade down to fish the mouth of the stream, into the saltchuck, as the tides came in. Or we might head off to a good fishing beach somewhere else, looking for sea-runs, or for the early Pink salmon, on the "Pink Years." By later afternoon the air would be cooling down, and we didn't need the shade so much, and we were wading in cool tidewater too. So refreshing. 
Dry fly fishing for cutthroat. We use these in the saltchuck too!
Artwork by Bob White


     Mixing up the fishing days with some variety this way is especially satisfying. And we never get bored. Each water has its own rhythm of flow, temperature, sound and color, surroundings, scenery, etc. And you have to riddle out what might work in the approach, as far as flies, presentations, pace, etc. There's a sense of movement, and progress through the day. But we don't ever let ourselves feel pressed, or on a set schedule. We are fortunate to have so much diverse variety of trout habitat here, with so many streams and rivers that terminate in the saltchuck, all around the Olympic Peninsula. We never really have to travel very far to find a good opportunity. And there's so much water out here, that there's always the chance of discovering something new. 


An early July Pink salmon took our trout fly!


    For a few months during most spring seasons here, there's a good opportunity to go summer steelhead fishing on some really beautiful waters. By mid summer the rivers here get very low, and this gets more challenging. But autumn rain really turns them on again. With the big snow pack and rain season we had last winter, and through this spring, I expect that the summer run fishing will be good well through to July or later this year. these are lovely, and easy walk and wade days, deep in the heart of wild nature. We can skate big dry flies, greased liners, and drift traditional single soft-hackle flies . . . If you like that sort of thing.


Olympic Peninsula Summer Steelhead fly fishing water.
Ask your doctor if being this happy is right for you!


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor



      I  guide fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer  run steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventures, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide, Rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and  River trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October. Please plan ahead! 

     
This is the traditional way to fly fish for sea-run Cutthroat!
SSShhh!!!  Listen to the quiet . . .
                                 
Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
W.S.U. Water Watchers and Beach Watchers Graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618