Friday, September 23, 2016

Autumnal Equinox



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


Autumn colors.
Photo Credit: Julie Knott

    Autumn has come on with a blustering rush here on the Olympic Peninsula. Today was a good example as we got rain in the morning here, and then a lot of wind, big waves, and we didn't fish the beaches while that was going on. Tonight the waters are calm again, and the sky is clear and cool, with a lovely starry night above. I can't wait for the burn ban to end,  so that I can sit by a fire under the stars with an impossibly cold beer. We have had some good cooling weather, refreshing light rains, and even a few heavier rains, with some strong and wild winds too, mixed in with the warmer days- A slow transition from summer to fall. It's like smoke under the door. We have come from the dry, dusty parched earth, to the sweet pungent relief of wet ferns and dripping conifers, in just a few weeks. Speaking of smoke, don't you just love these crisp autumn nights, icy clear skies, and the sweet smell of cedar smoke coming from the chimneys. 

   Fishing conditions on the west end Olympic Peninsula rivers are still kind of slow, with low water the main culprit. But September and October are really prime-time out here for the cutthroat trout fishing on some waters here. One of the best times is right now, as the October Caddis hatch is beginning with this solstice. And this hatch will go on for weeks, well through October. The hatch begins in the lower rivers, and slowly expands upriver over the weeks ahead. Some days it is like a blizzard out there. Unfortunately there is still an early closure scheduled for gamefish season on those same waters. This is supposed to protect returning fall run coho. I never hooked one of those salmon when I was trout fishing with a five weight rod and trout flies. I suppose that it is possible. But not likely. Especially on dry flies. At any rate, if you have plans for the autumn trout and steelhead fishing here, you better get moving on it, low water or not. 

    There is a spark of hope for the fall trout fishing, I am seeing the state open some gamefish seasons around the state as the coho run counts are improving in some places. Don't hold your breath though, for places like the Sol Duc River and Hoh River etc. Make sure to check the state, and National Park, fishing regulations before you head out there. Also check the state fishing hotline number, as that is updated immediately when there is a rule change.

   WDFW Rule changes online: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ 

   WDFW Fishing Rules Hotline: 360-902-2500


  
   Fortunately, we still have the excellent autumn sea-run coastal cutthroat trout fishing on our saltwaters to enjoy now. 


Autumn Sea-Run Coastal Cutthroat Trout.


And this fishing can go well into November up here in the northern waters. Some of us fish all winter. There's almost always a few nice fish around. But I have to say that fall is when the big ones show up. They have been out there cruising and bruising all summer, feeding, and growing. Last week I was out with a few anglers, and I was demonstrating how to cast and drop the fly on the water, and pick it back up again, with just a little bit of skating the fly up off of the water on the pickup. The idea is to make it look like a baitfish on the surface. But sometimes you are just showing someone how to cast, and the fly keeps hitting that same little spot on the water right in front of you. After a dozen or so drops and pickups of the fly, a very hefty and strong cutthroat grabbed the fly and proceeded to work the heck out of me. 

Nice, hard fighting, fat fall fish. 
Close your eyes . . .  
Imagine . . .
18 inches . . .
Deep and fat . . .

Sorry, No Picture.


   The forecast for the next week to ten days looks very good for our beach fishing. Mostly mild days, cooler nights. Light winds, almost no waves. Perfect sea-run cutthroat fishing weather. This won't do the rivers any good. I'll see you on the beaches! 

   
The most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.

Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking through October, and beyond. 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618

Thursday, August 25, 2016

A Saltchuck September


"Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!"


Closer to the Equinox

      Despite some pretty extreme heat days this summer, these late summer nights are growing ever longer and cooler.  Stepping out into the evening darkness, under the starlight, I can smell the deep scent of the cooling air and falling leaves already. Much of this is due to the recent drought that has caused some of the leaves to fall early. But it's also true that autumn is taking hold now. Without looking at the calendar you could feel it. And the fruit and vegetable crops have been way ahead all year. Some of the insect hatches here, like the termites, have been a little ahead of the normal times as well. The Autumn Equinox is less than a month away now. So even though we may get some more hot days ahead, it won't last long. That new moon coming on for the 1st of September will set the stage for some great tides and fishing this month too.


We have missed the coho fishing this year.

    Ordinarily I would be haunting the beaches from dawn to dusk at this time of year, fly fishing for the ocean-run coho that have provided me with so much good fishing for years here. 

   But perhaps no one else I know is as passionate about fly fishing for coho in Puget Sound waters as is Jimmy Lemert, owner of the famous Patricks Fly Shop in Seattle. Last year he set out to catch 51 coho in the weeks leading up to his  51st birthday. And he did it! 


Patrick's Fly Shop, Seattle.

Jimmy Lemert's 51st Birthday Coho.

   This year they closed the Puget Sound region coho runs to fishing before the runs even showed up. And last fall they closed all of the runs early, once it was obvious that the runs had collapsed. I appreciate the effort. But I have to wonder if it couldn't have been avoided by instituting some more conservative measures to begin with, years ago. Yes, we know that poor ocean conditions, and the persistent El Nino we had for a few years, have played a major role in the diminished runs here. But a big problem is also that we don't have great enough numbers of fish to survive these events to begin with. It is axiomatic that if you want a lot of fish, you need a lot of fish. And once you lose them, it is very slow going to get them back. I am really missing the beach fishing for coho. There have been enough optimistic fishing reports in other areas around the region this year to give me the impression that these fish can rebound, given time. I don't think that we should be fishing for them right now at all. Think of it as an investment in the future, rather than as a sacrifice.


Coho on a Miyawaki Beach Popper.
This is something worth protecting.


     We can be grateful for the cooing weather ahead, as it will improve the fishing on the lakes and streams, and even on the saltchuck. Most of our rivers are still running low and warm, but this autumn cooling will help all of that too. Even so, we need those first good autumn rains to get things moving on the rivers again. Check the fishing regulations before you head to the coastal rivers this year, as some of the waters will close early to protect returning coho salmon. Even with the closures, you will find coastal cutthroat trout and summer-run steehead out here on the Olympic Peninsula rivers.


    One thing that I am grateful for is our wonderful, wild sea-run coastal cutthroat trout. And autumn is prime-time for these truly tough fish.


At over 24 inches this is the biggest autumn sea-run cutthroat I have ever caught here.
But I have seen two others caught, also in the fall, that were bigger.
  The next two months of fishing here are what we look forward to all year!



The most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.

Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October and beyond. 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618

Friday, August 12, 2016

The Turning Season


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


"Stinky Pond"
Original watercolor by Diane Michelin
http://www.dianemichelin.com/

    I noticed it one night last week, when I was coming out of the movie theater at 9 p.m. It was almost dark already. It always comes as a shock. Even though I know that the days have been growing shorter, for months, ever since summer solstice on June 21st. A few weeks ago I was down at the beach, watching the warm sunset light glowing on the shoreline. It was a balmy but cloudy evening. A moment came when the sun dipped beneath the low overcast lid of grey clouds, and a stream of firey light splashed across the treetops, illuminating them in a blaze of color. This was the first hint of autumn on the rise here, even though it is still officially summer. But it's never too early to tie some October Caddis flies.It only lasted for a moment, but I was able to get a quick picture with my phone. I shared that picture with friends. and my gifted fly fishing artist friend, Diane Michelin, decided to recreate the experience with watercolors. She captured the warmth of this moment perfectly here. Go see her Diane Michelin Fly Fishing Fine Art page for more of her beautiful images. Diane is steeping herself in the wild country of British Columbia, where she paints and fly fishes. And she captures the fly fishing life in her art as few others can.

   Salmon fishing was closed here in Marine Area 9 two weeks ago. The quota for Chinook was met, and they are protecting coho salmon now too. Time will tell if they decide to reopen our beaches for salmon fishing, even if it will only be for catch & release, (which is all we do anyway!). 

   We had been getting some nice cool weather these last weeks here, plenty of cloud cover, cooler nights and days, and even a few sprinkles of rain. This weekend is really going to warm up again though, at least through Saturday out here on the Olympic Peninsula. With all of this warmth and humidity we have been getting, the termites are hatching out a bit early this year. Tonight, when I was watering the garden, they were swarming all around me, fluttering their wings in my face, landing in my hair. I am going to tie some big fluffy termite flies now too. A Kauffmann's Stimulator, in sizes 4 to 6, ruddy brown, works fine at a time like this, in freshwater, and on the saltchuck. The rivers are running low this time of year, which is expected. And in some places the water will be a bit warm for trout fishing. But if you do some hiking up the rivers and streams, into the shaded reaches, amid the pocket water, and in the deeper holes, there's trout, and summer steelhead to be had out there. There's always some cooler water around, if you work for it. This fishing will favor dawn and dusk, but especially dawn as it will be cooler, and low light conditions, long leaders and quiet presentations. Once the water temperatures get above 60 degrees, that puts dangerous stress on the fish that we hook, play and land. Don't forget your stream thermometer!



Summer run fishing. Look for the shade.

   Fly fishing for sea-run cutthroat trout on the Olympic Peninsula beaches is going very well this summer. And we have even seen a few resident coho around here too. The trout that have been out in the saltchuck all summer are growing fatter and stronger, and we'll have good fishing for them all through autumn again. There's some bigger herring and sandlance around now too, so don't be afraid to use some bigger flies, on size 6 hooks. I will usually guide for sea-runs through October. In my estimation, these are the best months for sea-run fishing. The mornings are crisp and cool, the days are tolerably warm and sunny, and the evenings are refreshingly cool again. Pick a tide and get at it!  



Pick a tide and get at it!



This is probably the most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October and beyond. 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618
   

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Mid-Summer Sea-Runs



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


A nice sea-run cutthroat trout takes the fly in shallow water.
     This time of year we are usually baking under a hot sun most of the days that we are on the water. I for one am appreciating the cool and cloudy weather this year. This week ahead looks to be summer'ish around the Olympic Peninsula. The long range forecast looks especially good, and fairly typical of July. So maybe we are getting a real summer here after all. Up until this week, I have been saying that we are having a very mild winter here so far.

    Traditional trout fly fishing lore will tell you that on hot sunny days, over shallow water, with no shade or vegetation to cover the water, much less help camouflage your presence, it's not going to be good for the fishing, And that trout will not be found in these circumstances. Every trout fisherman knows that you will have to go looking for them; under the cut banks and overhangs, in the deeper holes, the trout will be hiding in the shadows and shade, seeking cooler waters. There has been some research that tracked wild rainbow trout as much as 30 miles over 24 hours,(in the Delaware  river system), as they sought thermal refuge from the summer heat. That would make for some tough fishing. Especially once the water temperatures spike well above 60 degrees.  

    We don't have quite as much of that problem on our salt waters up here in the northern reaches of Puget Sound and Admiralty Inlet. Our water is often colder than the mid-sound, south-sound and Hood Canal area. With some localized variations, and depending upon tides and winds. A little trip planning will really help now. But even under a blazing hot summer sun, with no cover, we have often caught some very big sea-run cutthroat trout in shallow salt water. The key here is that the water was cold. So that means there was an incoming tide, carrying fresh cold water into the shallow areas. Sometimes you have to go looking for that.

You can observe live feed buoy data here: Puget Sound region buoy data

And you can observe real-time tide currents and heights here: (Your results may vary, depending upon your computer or phone system.) DeepZoom 

Those are helpful tools when you are trying to find colder water for trout fishing in the saltchuck. Also, get a good stream thermometer too. You can use it to check water temperatures at your favorite summer cutthroat fishing locations. You will be surprised at what you can learn about a particular location by doing this. Trout do not stay in warm water. They will move to colder water. Go fish in the colder water! 
Orvis Stream Thermometer.

    We've been catching a few nice trout on our trips up here lately. And there's been resident coho hanging around all of late spring, and  into summer so far.  These are very scrappy, tough little trout-sized salmon. And when they show up, they will take your trout flies too. Catch and release only. The tides around this most recent full moon have been great for later afternoon and evening fishing. The other night the water was just like wet glass. And the pale moonlight and cool night air were refreshing. You can fall in love with life doing this.


This is probably the most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October and beyond. 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

The day that lightning struck twice.



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


Learn about lightning safety here:
www.lightning safety.noaa.gov


  Having grown up in the northeast, I learned from an early age to be aware of lightning, and how to avoid it.  We would stand on the front porch on a summer evening and watch the sky light up for miles around us. We would see the flashes of electricity arcing across the sky, and we would count, "One-thousand-one, one- thousand-two, one-thousand-three . . ." Waiting for the booming thunder to follow the bright flashes of light. If the time between flashes of lightning and booming thunder got progressively shorter, we would go indoors and sit in the living room, away from windows, doors, wiring or plumbing etc. And if we were playing outdoors, we knew to get to shelter at the first rumbling of thunder in the distance. 

  There were plenty of stories about people, horses, livestock etc., that had been hit by lightning, and many were killed by this. I had countless televisions, answering machines, coffee makers, refrigerators, etc., killed by lightning strikes too. So I was always well aware of the dangers. I didn't take any chances. It was a common experience to be out fishing somewhere, on a hot, humid, hazy day, and to have a storm cell move in and suddenly lightning was sparking and booming all around you. The scariest times where when we would be out on a lake in an aluminum canoe when these storms would erupt. You either paddle like crazy for the shore, or you take your chances, lying on top of the life jackets  in the bottom of the canoe. Either way it is a crap shoot.  

    Once I began guiding fishermen in southwest Alaska, I learned that they almost never heard of any lightning strikes there. Some of the  other guides in camp had been there for years of fishing seasons and they never saw any lightning there. I though that was good news. I wouldn't have to worry about it all summer. One afternoon in July I was out behind the kitchen in the yard, washing out some coolers. It was a bluebird day, clear as a bell, about 70 degrees, no wind, plenty of mosquitoes. And then, "out of the blue"- CRAAAAAAKKK-BOOM!

   The lightning had struck the pump house, just a few dozen yards away. I was appropriately surprised / terrified by this. I was inside of that Lodge in a flash. My ears were ringing. Everyone in camp was surprised. They all went out to see the pump house, where it's tin rook was still smoking from the heat of the lightning discharge. I stayed behind, back on the sofa in the lodge, my hands folded in my lap. Outside the sky was still a lovely pastel blue, with no clouds or wind. I waited inside for an hour before going back out the door. We had to carry water by bucket for the rest of that week, as we waited for a new replacement pump. That was the closest call with lightning that I had ever experienced. And it was disturbing to me since no one expected that in that region, especially on a day like that. Any time I was in the outdoors back home in New England, I was always careful to seek cover right away, at the first sign of electrical storm danger. 

   
This stuff will kill you. Photo NOAA

      Once I had moved to the Puget Sound region I learned that lightning was more likely to occur in the mountains, and that closer to sea level it was "rare."  (My post-Alaska updated interpretation of the term "rare" included a presumed geographical radius of  about 50 feet of safety.) I wasn't going to take any chances!

     And then one warm, humid June day, I was out walking the beaches with a father and son whom I had guided several times before. We were sea-run cutthroat trout fishing on the Olympic Peninsula. As we were fishing our way down a sandy point, the air grew warmer, and heavier. And way off in the distance, from up in the mountains, I could hear thunder rolling down the slopes. I silently counted to myself, "One-one-thousand, two-one-thousand, three one-thousand . . ."  We could see just the faintest flicker of lightning flashes. The air had an ozone smell to it, and the thunder was growing ever closer. I knew we would have to seek shelter immediately. I told my guests to put their graphite fishing rods down on a nearby log, and run to their car. They looked at me like I was flat nuts. But once they saw me running back to the parking lot, they reacted quickly. (Perhaps the only thing more rare than being hit by lightning would be to see me actually running!)

   We got back the hundred yards to the cars, and a thunderstorm was blowing over the hills, across the bay, and right down upon us. Breathlessly, I told the men to stay in the car, keep their hands on their laps, touching nothing, don't put the keys in the ignition, keep the windows shut. Wait till the storm passes. Then I turned to get into my truck. I was standing in a puddle, holding the steel door, stepping into the truck, when the lightning struck the fence nearby. It sounded like a howitzer cannon going off, right next to my head. The pain was immediate, and overwhelming. There were little streaks of electricity showering off of the fence-line, grounding into anything nearby. I was instantly, utterly paralyzed with electricity and pain. Every cell in my body was on fire. I couldn't do anything as my muscles were rigid with the shock. It felt like an eternity. I thought, "This is the end." And then it let go of me. Just as suddenly, I was able to now move, and I jumped into my truck, with lightning banging all around us. I glanced over at the guys, still safely in the car next to me, and their faces were transfixed in horror and astonishment, at the sight of me, still alive, just sitting in my truck smiling back at them.  

   We watched the storm blow through, and as it swept across the bay and up over the opposite shoreline, with  flashes of lightning and rumbling thunder all of the way. In about a half hour it was out of sight, and the air had cleared. It was a nice, cooler, sunny day on the beach. So we went fishing again.  We were all giddy with the experience. I felt alright at the time. Just glad to have survived that lightning shock. And I was happy to be fishing again. The dad in this pair was casting a streamer, and stripping it back in, and it had been slow going. But now he had a good fighting, robust fish on. And even though it was "early" for it, I suspected that he had hooked a big ocean run coho. He had the rod deeply bent, in an almost vertical lifting pose, when I told him to just walk back up the beach, until the fish touches the sand. He did it, perfectly, and the fish slid into a few inches of water at our feet. There in the wash of the waves, I looked down to see a beautiful, enormous, wild sea-run cutthroat trout, well over 20 inches long. And with a flip and a turn the fish darted away, leaving the barbless hook Clouser Minnow fly on the beach as he darted away. I was dumbstruck. The old man had let all of the pressure off of the fish. He had allowed the leader to go completely slack. And that was that. 

Trust me when I tell you that lightning struck me twice that day. 


This is probably the most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October and beyond. 


Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618


Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Summer Solstice


Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide.
Catch and Release, fly fishing only!



Summer! Well, almost . . .
.
   The summer solstice came in with a bang last night. We had thunder storms for a few hours here late last night. And we had a full "strawberry moon" too. There's a little rain in the forecast here mid week, but it shouldn't stop our fishing plans. We still have a few weeks of "Sprummer" to get through here in Western Washington. The garden is growing like crazy and I am mowing and weeding as fast as I can. 

   I got out on the beach with a few friends last week, for some sea-run cutthroat trout fishing. We did a benefit trip for Chad Brown and his Soul River Runs Deep programs. Brian Lencho made the donation, and he brought along Leland Miyawaki and Craig Lannigan for the day.  It was a beautiful morning to fish. We had a magical Japanese "Bento" lunch, provided by Leland. And we got to fish a little in the afternoon, before the thunder got too close for my comfort. Once you have been hit by lightning, you never take it for granted again. (I will tell that story here someday.) 


The Three Amigos.

Leland created this beautiful Bento.

Wonderfully careful . . .


Carefully wonderful.

Sake Salute!

Fishing with Leland.

Afternoon session with Leland . . . And thunder.


Waiting out the storm. The rain got cold!


We ended up at the Spruce Goose Cafe.


Hot home made pie and coffee!


    It's always good to spend a day with friends on the water. But doubly so when it means that there are some deserving kids or veterans, who are going to be doing a little better because of these donations. Please support Soul River Runs Deep.




This is probably the most relaxing way to fish for sea-run cutthroat.
One angler, maybe two,  Call or write for details.


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

    I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, or row along the shorelines in the dory, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for Cutthroat trout and summer steelhead. This is all strictly catch and release, traditional, barbless single hook, fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction for beginners through advanced casters. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for all levels of ability, beginner to expert. Public presentations, Naturalist Guide, rowboat picnics, tide pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details. Now booking for April through October and beyond. 

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
2006 W.S.U.Beach Watcher / Water Watcher graduate
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618